AfricanCowboy Header
photo of Captin McCown

The Buffalo Soldiers

More: 9th Cavalry
Seated: Captain McCown on left and Friends

Buffalo Soldiers Was the unofficial name given to six all-black regiments of the U.S. Army that were established by Congress in 1866. They got their nickname from the Native Americans, possibly because they thought the soldiers’ hair resembled the mane of a buffalo.The Buffalo Soldiers were awarded more Medals of Honor than any other American military unit—proving that they also shared the Buffalo’s fearlessness, toughness, and strength.

Though the enlisted men in the Buffalo Soldiers were all black, their officers were usually white. One exception was Lieutenant Henry O. Flipper. Born into slavery, he became the first African American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the first black commander of a U.S. military regiment.

 

 

Cap. McCown received his commission in the field. During their first decades, the Buffalo Soldiers served in the Indian Wars and other military campaigns in the Southwest and Great Plains. They also performed other jobs, such as building roads and protecting the U.S. Mail. At the end of the 19th century, black regiments served with honor in the Spanish-American and Philippine-American wars, and later in the two World Wars and the Korean War.

All-black military units continued to serve with distinction until the U.S. Army became integrated in the 1950th’s. Buffalo Soldiers often encountered racial prejudice from other members of the Army as well as from civilians in the places where they were stationed. Although, they were assigned to the worst posts, suffered the harshest discipline, the worst food, equipment and shelter. They had the lowest rate of desertion in the Army.

The Buffalo Soldiers was the unofficial name given to six all-black regiments of the U.S. Army that were established by Congress in 1866. They got their nickname from the Native Americans, possibly because they thought the soldiers’ hair resembled the mane of a buffalo. The Buffalo Soldiers were awarded more Medals of Honor than any other American military unit—proving that they also shared the
Buffalo’s fearlessness, toughness, and strength. Though the enlisted men in the Buffalo Soldiers were all black, their officers were usually white. One exception was Lieutenant Henry O. Flipper. Born into slavery, he became the first African American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the first black commander of a U.S. military regiment.

9th Cavalry at Fort Riley KC.

Captain McCown on the right

During their first decades, the Buffalo Soldiers served in the Indian Wars and other military campaigns in the Southwest and Great Plains. They also performed other jobs, such as building roads and protecting the U.S. mail. At the end of the 19th century, black regiments served with honor in the Spanish-American and Philippine-American wars, and later in the two World Wars and the Korean War. All-black military units continued to serve with distinction until the U.S. Army became integrated in the 1950th’s. Buffalo Soldiers often encountered racial prejudice from other members of the army as well as from civilians in the places where they were stationed. Though they were assigned to the worst posts, suffered the harshest discipline, the worst food, equipment, and shelter, they had the lowest rate of desertion in the Army.

 

 

previous pg.25 | next pg.27

Home pg.1 | pg.2 | pg.3 | pg.4 | pg.5 | pg.6 | pg,7 | pg,8 | pg.9 | pg10. | pg.11
pg.12 | pg.13 | pg.14 | pg.15 | pg.16 | pg.17 | pg.18 | pg.19 | pg.20 | pg.21
pg.22 | pg.23 | pg.24 | pg.25 | pg.26 | pg.27 | pg.28 | pg.29 | pg.30 | pg.31
pg.32 | pg33 | pg.34 | pg.35 | pg.36



AfricanCowboys.net / 26.Buffalo Soldiers text.html

Emerson R. Terry / erterry@charter.net
Skype /emersonrterry / Copyright © 1997
Revised: March 30,1998 Revised: 2009
Revised / Revised 2011